FRETWORK, with LUTENIST ELIZABETH KENNY perform Music of John Dowland

Saturday! 

_I3R9203-2FRETWORK, with LUTENIST ELIZABETH KENNY
Lacrimae:  Music of John Dowland in observance of the 450th anniversary of his birth.

SATURDAY, NOV. 2, 2013, 7:30 PM
First Christian Church 1601 Sunset Blvd. Houston, Texas 77005

Pre-concert talk by ensemble members at 6:45pm

View Photos from the Concert

Read a preview of the program

 

One of the world’s leading viola da gamba consorts, Fretwork, brings their contemporary sensibility to John Dowland’s famous collection, Lachrimae. To honor the 450th anniversary of Dowland’s birth, we embark on a transcendental voyage from despair to hope through an extraordinary collection of music for viols and lute based on his most famous song, Flow my tearesContinue reading

Original manuscript for “Flow My Tears”

The featured work on this Saturday’s Houston Early Music concert will be Dowland’s Lachrimae, or Seven Teares, which includes 7 pavans for viol consort and lute written on the same theme, Dowland’s famous song “Flow My Teares.” The performing group, Fretwork, has provided program notes about the music. If you want to read about it in advance, you can find the notes on the Houston Early Music website. In addition, you can take a look at the original manuscript on IMSLP. Scroll down to the “Sheet Music” section to see the complete score. You can see how the music is arranged to be played by the musicians sitting around table. 

Chronicle says ‘Flow My Tears’ is a reason to celebrate

Long before country-and-western songwriters discovered the joy of expressing heartache, musicians of Elizabethan England were all over it.

Chronicle article: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/life/article/Flow-My-Tears-is-a-reason-to-celebrate-4926688.php#/0

Houston Early Music Season for 2013-2014

Houston Early Music Season for 2013-2014

Join Houston Early Music for our 2013-2014 Concert Season with five stellar ensembles. Sounds of ancient origins, powerful and timeless, inspire and transport audiences.  Continue reading

April 26, 2013: CANÇONIER

Friday, April 26, 2013

CANÇONIER
The Black Dragon: Music from the time of Vlad Dracula
7:30PM, Palmer Memorial Episcopal Church
6221 Main Street

A pre-concert talk with ensemble members will begin at 6:45 p.m.

PROGRAM NOTES | PRESS RELEASE

The San Francisco-based ensemble’s program features 15th-century music from the time of the infamous Vlad the Impaler, whose tyrannical rule shocked Europe. Ensemble member Shira Kammen is known by many in the area from her early-music performances in Houston. The program features the Lamentation for the Fall of Constantinople by Dufay, French and Italian dance music, German songs, Balkan folk songs, and more.

CANÇONIER Program Notes

Program Notes and Artist Biographies for Cançonièr “The Black Dragon – Music from the Time of Vlad Dracula” 


 PROGRAM NOTES

The fifteenth century was a time of remarkable change in music, as musical conventions and practices evolved from medieval to early Renaissance styles. It also was a time of major transitions in art, religion, politics, and technology. During this century, Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks, the printing press was invented, the Tudors took the crown of England, the Moors were expelled from southern Spain, Christopher Columbus sailed, Leonardo da Vinci was born and began to work, the Renaissance in Italy bloomed in full, and for a few years, a man who would become infamous ruled a small country called Wallachia in what is now southern Romania.

He was called Vlad Dracula (c.1431 – 1476). His father, Vlad II, adopted the name Dracul (“Dragon”) when he joined the Order of the Dragon, a chivalric order dedicated to crusading against the Turks in the Balkans. His son took the name Dracula, or “Son of the Dragon.” Dracula was, of course, partially the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s iconic anti-hero, though he was no vampire. 

Read The Black Dragon: Music from the time of Vlad Dracula in PDF format, or continue on web:   

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