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Press Release: Celebrate the Holidays in Mexican Baroque style with The Rose Ensemble

HOUSTON EARLY MUSIC P. O. Box 271193 Houston, TX 77277-1193 HoustonEarlyMusic.org Media contact: Susan Love Fitts, 936-597-8825 susanlovefitts@consolidated.net Celebrate the Holidays in Mexican Baroque style with The Rose Ensemble Houston Early Music’s Hispanic Heritage Series spotlights early music of the Americas HOUSTON, TX— November 5, 2009 – Houston Early Music presents The Rose Ensemble in Celebremos el Niño – A Mexican Baroque Christmas on Sunday, December 13 at 5:00 p.m., at Christ Church Cathedral as part an annual tradition, the Hispanic Heritage Series. The internationally known group brings a rare collection of early Mexican music, featuring over two centuries of festive Christmas dances, ballads and villancicos from the great cathedrals of Puebla and Mexico City. “This is remarkable music that is not heard that often,” says Nancy Ellis, artistic director of Houston Early Music. “We are delighted to bring The Rose Ensemble to Houston for the very first time.” Continue reading

Music review: Red Priest entertains with unique technical wizardry

from Houston Chronicle

Music review: Red Priest entertains with unique technical wizardry

By CHARLES WARD ARTS WRITER

Oct. 29, 2009, 5:55PM

If any Baroque-music purists survived the Houston debut of Red Priest, Tuesday’s concert at Midtown’s Trinity Episcopal Church would have been their personal Nightmare on Main Street.

Actually, the four-member, Britain-based ensemble called the evening Nightmare in Venice and, in the spirit of Halloween, featured music composed in Stylus Phantasticus, a 17th-century style noted for its free-form, fantastical moods and unexpected musical effects

Red Priest recorders, violin, Baroque cello and harpsichord opened with a concerto by the original red priest, Italy’s Antonio Vivaldi. ForLa Notte (The Night), the players entered in black hoods and robes, one musician from the side of the church’s chancel and the rest from the church’s rear. They played the horror film-like special effects with ghoulish glee and fabulous virtuosity. Continue reading